Are Barbecues Bad For Your Health?

As we settle into the barbecue season, it’s time to consider whether the meat on your grill is harming your health. Conflicting messages in the media certainly don’t help. On one hand are advertisements with Sam Neill claiming red meat is the reason that humans are smarter than orangutans. On the other, the prestigious World Cancer Research Fund reports that red meat may cause colorectal cancer. Whom to believe? The good bits, and bad Some red meat does contain fats our brains need. Omega-3 fats form part of the structure of brains and eyes, and may also help reduce blood pressure and modify inflammation. But meat isn’t the only food containing omega-3 fats. In fact, the richest sources are oily fish. And if you buy grain-fed steak, you may be getting hardly any omega-3 fats at all. Grass-fed meat (and wild meats, such as kangaroo) is not only better for the environment, but better nutritionally, containing healthier fats and a lower fat content overall. Red meat also contains decent amounts of zinc and protein, as well as iron, which is one of its big nutritional selling points. Indeed, the iron in red meat is in a form that our bodies absorb easily — “haem” iron. Meat producers are fond of producing colourful ads that equate the iron content of a bucket-load of spinach with that of a small juicy-looking nugget of lean beef. And iron deficiency is an important issue — but that same haem iron may be harmful in fatty processed meat as you will see. As well as beneficial nutrients, meat also contains saturated fat, the kind...

The Living To 100 Calculator Predicts Your Life Span

Figuring out how long you can expect to live is important for planning your retirement and how much you should be saving. You don’t have to just pull a number out of the air though. This calculator estimates your expected life span based on medical research and your own unique health factors. The Living to 100 Life Expectancy Calculator is offered by the Boston University School of Medicine. It’s based on the largest study of centenarians and their families, as well as other longevity studies. The calculator asks you 40 questions covering things like your nutrition, family history of diseases, sleep patterns, and even results from your last checkup, such as cholesterol and blood pressure readings. Then you get the magic number as well as estimates of how tweaking different things in your life could increase your life expectancy. Obviously, we can’t know for certain exactly how long we will live, but this tool can help you plan your finances better and make better health choices. Note that you’ll need to register with an email address at the end of the quiz to get your results. Living to 100 Life Expectancy Calculator [via Forbes] Share this:PrintEmailFacebookTwitterGoogleLike this:Like...

Improve Your Willpower By Reminding Yourself Of Your Goals And Values

Whether you believe you’ve only got a limited supply of willpower or not, resisting temptation and making better choices is always a challenge. Epipheo.TV continues its month-long series on life hacks, showing us how to strengthen our willpower by tapping into the more unknown facets of willpower. Kelly McGonigal, author of The Willpower Instinct, breaks willpower into three different powers: I Won’t Power: what we normally think of as willpower (resisting temptation) I Will Power: the ability to remember you want the consequences of doing that difficult thing (e.g., drinking more water instead of a big box of wine for a healthier future self) I Want Power: the ability to keep a clear memory of what you care about most Those last two things are a more positive framework that tap into your long-term goals and values and could make it easier to change habits. Just saying “no” to all the short-term temptations may not be enough. Share this:PrintEmailFacebookTwitterGoogleLike this:Like...
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