The Living To 100 Calculator Predicts Your Life Span

Figuring out how long you can expect to live is important for planning your retirement and how much you should be saving. You don’t have to just pull a number out of the air though. This calculator estimates your expected life span based on medical research and your own unique health factors. The Living to 100 Life Expectancy Calculator is offered by the Boston University School of Medicine. It’s based on the largest study of centenarians and their families, as well as other longevity studies. The calculator asks you 40 questions covering things like your nutrition, family history of diseases, sleep patterns, and even results from your last checkup, such as cholesterol and blood pressure readings. Then you get the magic number as well as estimates of how tweaking different things in your life could increase your life expectancy. Obviously, we can’t know for certain exactly how long we will live, but this tool can help you plan your finances better and make better health choices. Note that you’ll need to register with an email address at the end of the quiz to get your results. Living to 100 Life Expectancy Calculator [via Forbes] Share this:PrintEmailFacebookTwitterGoogleLike this:Like...

Genetic Clue Discovered For Why Women Outlive Men

A new study of mitochondrial DNA in fruit flies offers a number of clues that might explain why females tend to outlive males across much of the animal kingdom, including humans. Researchers from Monash University in Australia and Lancaster University in the UK, write about their work in the 2 August online issue of Current Biology. They found male fruit flies appear to have mutations in their mitochondrial DNA that affect how fast they age and how long they live. Scientists use fruit flies as models for studies in genes and aging because their biological processes are remarkably similar to that of other animals, such as humans, and with a lifespan of about a month, it doesn't take too long to investigate generational effects. Senior author Damian Dowling, a research fellow in the Monash School of Biological Sciences, told the press: "All animals possess mitochondria, and the tendency for females to outlive males is common to many different species. Our results therefore suggest that the mitochondrial mutations we have uncovered will generally cause faster male aging across the animal kingdom." "Intriguingly, these same mutations have no effects on patterns of aging in females. They only affect males," he added. Mitochondria are special subunits of cells, about the same size as bacteria, that provide the energy for life. They combine sugar and oxygen into adenosine triphosphate or ATP, molecular packets of energy that are usable by cells. Mitochondria have their own DNA that is quite separate from the cellular DNA in the nucleus of the cell. And, unlike cellular DNA, which is inherited from the sperm and egg that fuse to make the new...

Testosterone Does Not Necessarily Wane With Age

For many men, testosterone levels drop as they get older, but new research presented at a conference this week suggests this is not necessarily a consequence of age itself, but more to do with behavior, such as smoking, and changes in health, such asobesity and depression. In men, the hormone testosterone is made in the testicles and controls the development of their sexual characteristics. It influences wellbeing, sexual function and fertility and also helps maintain a healthy body composition, develop muscle bulk, sufficient levels of red blood cells, and protect bone density. Study co-author Dr Gary Wittert, professor of medicine at the University of Adelaide, told the press: "It is critical that doctors understand that declining testosterone levels are not a natural part of aging and that they are most likely due to health-related behaviors or health status itself," he added. Past research has shown that many men have low levels of testosterone, and some have linked depression and low testosterone, but few population studies have followed the same group of men over time, said Wittert. For the latest study, the researchers analyzed testosterone measurements in more than 1,500 men who had their hormone levels tested twice, with a five year gap between clinic visits. All the samples were tested at the same point in time before, and then after, the five-year gap, said Wittert. Wittert and colleagues only included 1,382 men in their analysis because they took out the ones who were on medication or had health conditions that affect hormone levels. The men they included had an average age of 54 (range was 35 to 80 years). They found...
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