The 5:2 Diet Might Just Be Tricking You

The 5:2 Diet Might Just Be Tricking You

The “new” weight-loss strategy known as the 5:2 diet has been receiving much attention in the media since the book The Fast Diet: The Secret of Intermittent Fasting – Lose Weight, Stay Healthy, Live Longer was launched late last year. But does it really work? Surinder Baines examines the evidence. Lettuce picture from Shutterstock The 5:2 diet allows you to eat as usual for five days and to fast for two days. On fasting days, the dieters need to restrict intake of food to approximately 2000 kilojoules (500 calories) a day for women or 2400 kilojoules (600 calories) for men. The two days of fasting don’t have to be consecutive and you can decide how you want to spread your food intake on those days as long as you adhere to energy restriction. The food consumed during the two fasting days should have little fat and carbohydrate content and alcohol consumption is not recommended. During the two fasting days, you are typically allowed protein foods such as eggs, or low-fat yogurt or cheese for breakfast and protein foods such as chicken, fish, lean meat, along with salad or other non-starchy vegetables for lunch or dinner. You are permitted water, green tea, or black coffee. While you can have milk with your beverages, it must be counted toward your caloric intake. Not a fad? Intermittent fasting or restricting energy intake for weight loss, which is what the diet is based on, is not a new concept. And there are other kinds of fasting diets around, such as “alternate day fasting”. But while energy restriction in the form of various weight-loss diets has been investigated in...
Exercise Decreases Your Desire To Eat, But You’ll Probably Eat More Anyway

Exercise Decreases Your Desire To Eat, But You’ll Probably Eat More Anyway

Adam Dachis Exercise burns calories, so you might assume it makes you feel hungrier. It turns out that’s not true. US News points to several studies showing that your desire to eat actually decreases after a workout. Picture: Nagy-Bagoly Arpad/Shutterstock Brigham Young University conducted a study to test how women responded to eating after exercise and without exercise. The California Polytechnic State University conducted a more comprehensive study, including men and women, engaging in a larger variety of physical activity. While both study sizes were fairly small, each clearly found the desire to eat decreased in participants (based on their responses and brain activity). We’re not actually desiring food after exercise, but we tend to eat more anyway. In fact, we’ll eat more if we even think about exercise. US News explains: Psychologists at the University of Leeds, in England, observed that compensatory eating post-exercise is common among “hedonic eaters”-people who eat for pleasure rather than to maintain energy balance, according to the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. In the study, “compensators” showed signs of hedonic hunger. Not only did they eat more than “non-compensators” after a high-intensity workout, but they also rated the food more palatable and had more interest in high-fat, sweet foods. When you’re hungry, you should eat, but pay attention to how you actually feel rather than what you want. You may just think you’re hungry after exercise when, in reality, you’re not. Does Exercise Distort Your Perception of Hunger? [US News] Share this:PrintEmailFacebookTwitterGoogleLike this:Like...
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