Recent Injury? How to get back on your feet and return running

Recent Injury? How to get back on your feet and return running

by Jason Fitzgerald Running injuries can be unfortunately abundant, but it’s hard to keep a runner down for very long. Unsurprisingly, one of the most common questions I hear is: “How do I return to running after an injury?“ Photos and images by Whologwhy, Vestman, Ed Yourdon, Regissercom and Diamond_Images This post originally appeared on Strength Running But it’s also an exceptionally complex question and there are always followups: What type of injury do you have? Is it chronic or your first time? Did you run through pain (and make it worse)? How much time did you take off from running? So my answers aren’t usually the most helpful because I don’t know your training background or your level of running experience . Runners that I work with personally will get more specific advice because I know more of their variables and can offer specific solutions. Recently I wrote about my Achilles tendon injury and how I was back to my pre-injury training volume within a week of being healthy, roughly. Many were curious how I was able to return to running so soon after my Achilles injury. This post is a case study on how I modified my post-injury training, what worked for me, and how you can apply the same lessons to your running. Before we get into the exact steps I took, let’s be clear that this is a more aggressive approach for two important reasons: My training age is 15+ years (which means I can be more aggressive because of my experience level — I really know my body). I’m training to run a very competitive marathon in about ten weeks, so it’s now or never. I’m willing take risks, though I wouldn’t...

Your BMI Might Make You Think You’re Healthier Than You Are

ADAM DACHIS Your BMI, or Body Mass Index, gives you a number designed to indicate whether you are at a healthy weight or not. According to the health experts over at Examine.com, BMIs tend to provide you with a more flattering look at your situation than reality might otherwise indicate.P BMI (Body Mass Index) is not a highly accurate measure of obesity. That being said, its more complimenting than anything. BMI has a high rate of false negatives (obese people actually being classified as normal or overweight) encroaching on 50% in some studies, particularly among females. The amount of false positives seen with BMI (non-obese persons with enough lean mass to be classified as obese) is surprisingly small; less than 5% in men and 1% in women according to one study.P For those unfamiliar, you calculate your BMI by dividing your weight in kilograms by your height in meters squared. (If you don't want to do this calculation yourself, just use an online BMI calculator like this one.) False positives likely occur more often in men due to heavier amounts of muscle mass, but regardless 5% is still a very small number. Around 50%, however, is a bit troubling. If you find yourself on the higher end of the BMI range, don't take comfort in such a rating. You might not be quite as healthy as you think, so see a doctor to find out if you need an adjustment in the level of your physical activity and your diet.P How valid is BMI as a measure of health and obesity? | Examine.comP Photo by Jaimie Duplass (Shutterstock). Share this:PrintEmailFacebookTwitterGoogleLike this:Like...

Slow Down When Exercising To Burn More Fat

Misleading information can make exercise more complicated than it should be. Fitness tech company Digifit dispels common cardio workout myths and says that while you might burn more calories with a harder workout, a slower one will burn more fat. Picture: Steve Garner The best method for burning fat at a higher percentage is a steady, consistent workout in Zone 2 (60-69% max heart rate), the fat burning zone. This zone uniquely targets fat because fat is a slow burning fuel, so if you do a long and less-intense workout, your body will target a higher amount of fat cells then carbohydrates. While you may burn more net calories in higher heart rate zones, you will burn the highest per cent of fat calories in Zone 2. Pushing yourself too hard too often isn’t good for you anyway, so it’s a good idea to make those intense workouts the exception rather than the rule. For more heart training myth busting, check out the full post over on Digifit. Share this:PrintEmailFacebookTwitterGoogleLike this:Like...

Light Exercise After Meals Can Improve Heart Health

We know that eating well and staying active keep you healthy, but we’re still in the process of discovering the best times to eat and exercise. Through a study by the American College of Sports Medicine, it turns out light exercise specifically after a meal can help improve your heart health. Here’s why: “High triglyceride levels can put individuals at risk for cardiovascular disease, heart attack, and other heart-related conditions. Regular exercise is a good way to keep triglycerides from becoming elevated, and the results of this study may help individuals manage their triglyceride levels more effectively by considering the timing,” said the primary investigator, Wataru Aoi, Ph.D., of Kyoto Prefectural University in Kyoto, Japan. In a small sample of healthy participants who were not currently participating in an exercise program, a low-intensity exercise combination of walking and light resistance exercises suppressed the elevation of post-meal triglyceride concentration after eating a high-fat meal. This effect was noted in VLDL, LDL, and HDL fractions. These findings seem to conflict with the more commonly-held belief that exercise before eating is better as it boosts your metabolism and aids in better digestion, but the two don’t necessarily contradict one another. Whether you exercise before or not, it looks like you will do yourself a favour by moving around post-meal. After all, it makes sense. When your body is working to digest food, lying around probably isn’t going to help. You can learn more about the ACSM on its website. Share this:PrintEmailFacebookTwitterGoogleLike this:Like...

How Exercising More Can Be A Recipe For Injury

  If I’m honest, I never really liked running, but every new year when I was in high school, I made the resolution to try out for the track team. We started training before snow was off the streets of Detroit by “running the stairs” — run down the hall, up three flights of stairs, back down the hall, down three flights. They worked us hard and within a couple of weeks every one of us was hobbling around with shin splints. Injury picture by Shutterstock We all recovered, but we clearly had an effective recipe for injury. What we didn’t know was that our shin splints were actually the early stages of stress fractures. Most research into exercise-induced injuries involve military recruits who undergo intense exercise in their basic training. Injury rates in this group can be over 35 per cent, but they’re highly variable and dependent on the training regime, as well as the level and type of previous exercise. It’s not necessarily the intensity of exercise that seems to produce injuries. Rather injuries are more likely with a change in intensity or loading. First peak for injuries It might be expected that the frequency of injury would decline with time after the load increased, but this in not necessarily the case. Rather, there are two peak times for injury — one in the first two weeks and one in the period between eight and 11 weeks. The first peak includes a high incidence of stress fractures, just like in my high school story. Bones get stronger and re-model in response to increased exercise, but the process takes time. Increased load produces...
%d bloggers like this: