What Is AIDS? What Is HIV?

AIDS (Acquired immune deficiency syndrome or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) is a disease caused by a virus called HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus). The illness alters the immune system, making people much more vulnerable to infections and diseases. This susceptibility worsens as the disease progresses. HIV is found in the body fluids of an infected person (semen and vaginal fluids, blood and breast milk). The virus is passed from one person to another through blood-to-blood and sexual contact. In addition, infected pregnant women can pass HIV to their babies during pregnancy, delivering the baby during childbirth, and through breast feeding. HIV can be transmitted in many ways, such as vaginal, oral sex, anal sex, blood transfusion, and contaminated hypodermic needles. Both the virus and the disease are often referred to together as HIV/AIDS. People with HIV have what is called HIV infection. As a result, some will then develop AIDS. The development of numerous opportunistic infections in an AIDS patient can ultimately lead to death. According to research, the origins of HIV date back to the late nineteenth or early twentieth century in west-central Africa. AIDS and its cause, HIV, were first identified and recognized in the early 1980s. There is currently no cure for HIV/AIDS. Treatments can slow the course of the disease - some infected people can live a long and relatively healthy life. Estimated HIV/AIDS prevalence among young adults (15-49) by country as of 2008. UNAIDS 2008 report What is the difference between HIV and AIDS? HIV is the virus which attacks the T-cells in the immune system. AIDS is the syndrome which appears in advanced stages of HIV infection. HIV is a virus. AIDS...

South Africa Recalls Millions Of Condoms

Health authorities in South Africa have recalled more than a million condoms that were handed out in the lead up to the African National Congress centenary celebrations. The action was taken after South Africa's HIV group Treatment Action Campaign (TAC) issued a warning, having received complaints from the public, that large numbers of faulty condoms appeared to be in circulation in the Bloemfontein area. 8,700 boxes of condoms, with the South African Bureau of Standards stamp, were delivered to guesthouses, hotels, restaurants and bars before the ANC celebrations. Authorities are still investigating complaints that the condoms are porous. The Free State Health Department said the recall, which they estimate at 1.35 million condoms is just a "precautionary measure" and asked the public not to be alarmed. TAC's Sello Mokhalipi told the BBC that condoms : "Are still out there in large numbers and that is of great concern to us ... The complaints are that the condoms broke during intercourse." He continued that the TAC conducted its own investigations using some of the condoms handed out during the centenary celebrations and discovered them to be porous : Free State Health Department spokesperson Jabu Mbalula said the health authority would not be able to make a clear statement on the issue until it had conducted its own tests on the condoms recovered from the handouts. This is the first time that Free State province, which has a population of 5.5 million people, needed to recall condoms, although it's not the first time that South Africa has had problems of this kind. In August 2007 when 20 million contraceptives were recalled after "hundreds...
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