The Living To 100 Calculator Predicts Your Life Span

Figuring out how long you can expect to live is important for planning your retirement and how much you should be saving. You don’t have to just pull a number out of the air though. This calculator estimates your expected life span based on medical research and your own unique health factors. The Living to 100 Life Expectancy Calculator is offered by the Boston University School of Medicine. It’s based on the largest study of centenarians and their families, as well as other longevity studies. The calculator asks you 40 questions covering things like your nutrition, family history of diseases, sleep patterns, and even results from your last checkup, such as cholesterol and blood pressure readings. Then you get the magic number as well as estimates of how tweaking different things in your life could increase your life expectancy. Obviously, we can’t know for certain exactly how long we will live, but this tool can help you plan your finances better and make better health choices. Note that you’ll need to register with an email address at the end of the quiz to get your results. Living to 100 Life Expectancy Calculator [via Forbes] Share this:PrintEmailFacebookTwitterGoogleLike this:Like...

Don’t Trust Mobile Apps To Detect Skin Cancer

Skin cancer is one of the most common causes of death in Australia. Early detection is important, but a new research study confirms that smartphone apps which photograph your skin and attempt to identify melanomas do a very poor job. The study, published in JAMA Dermatology, examined the performance of four smartphone apps in assessing 188 images of skin lesions. 128 of the inages were benign, and 60 were melanomas. The study doesn’t name the applications directly, but both iOS and Android apps were examined. Performance of the four apps was highly variable (some rely on automated analysis, others send the image to a dermatologist for analysis), but even the best performing app only had a positive predictive value of 42.1 per cent. Three out of the four apps incorrectly classified 30 per cent or more melanomas as benign and not risky. The lesson is clear: get any skin abnormality that concerns you checked by a doctor. This is not a case for Dr iPhone. As the study points out: “Reliance on these applications, which are not subject to regulatory oversight, in lieu of medical consultation can delay the diagnosis of melanoma and harm users.” Diagnostic Inaccuracy of Smartphone Applications for Melanoma Detection [JAMA Dermatology] Share this:PrintEmailFacebookTwitterGoogleLike this:Like...
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